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Illumicrate: What’s Inside

Hi guys! I just received my second Illumicrate, a wonderful quarterly subscription box for lovers of the Young Adult genre!*

Illumicrate

It’s a fabulous collection of stuff curated by just one person in the United Kingdom named Daphne. I don’t know how she does it, the thought and love put into each box is astonishing.

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For starters, obviously, it always comes with a book (and usually a signed bookplate or two to go with it). This round, we received When We Collided by Emery Lord (which you can expect a review on soon). Also included was a four-chapter sampler of Laini Taylor’s Strange the Dreamer. According to the website, she tries to include brand-new books so the possibility of someone having already read it is very slim! (Also, they’re UK editions of the books, which is a pretty cool bonus for me since that’s definitely not something I’d ordinarily obtain.)

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This quarter’s box was filled with all sorts of lovely knick-knacks, most of which are exclusives from small businesses on Etsy (and/or similar websites). Here’s what the packing list says:

  • “To Be Read” List Notepad by Goodnight Boutique (exclusive) – keep track of your TBR pile and other bookish to-dos with this specially designed notepad
  • Ex Libris Stamp by Little Stamp Store (exclusive) – mark books from your library or create cards and tags with this gorgeous, versatile stamp
  • Book Club Mug by The Art of Escapism (exclusive) – great for indoor and outdoor use when discussing your latest reads
  • Readers Gonna Pin pin by Literary Emporium – display your reader status proudly with this adorable enamel pin
  • Bookworm clips by My Bookish Mark (exclusive) – use these little cuties to mark your place in books or planners

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Not mentioned on the packing list:

  • 4-mini-button set from author Jenny McLachlan
  • postcard featuring #mystery&mayhem, which appears to be a collaboration of twelve authors
  • set of postcards (or placards, moreso) that match the art from the Emery Lord novel, featuring quotes from said novel
  • card with excerpt from The Square Root of Summer by Harriet Reuter Hapgood, entitled “How to Make A Wormhole”
  • on the back of the card is a recipe for the cinnamon muffins from the aforementioned novel (makes 12 muffins, which I will probably make and eat ALL BY MYSELF)

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That about cover this quarter’s contents! I’m really excited to dive into the book (and to check out The Square Root of Summer and eat muffins while I read). Thanks to Illumicrate for another stunning creation; can’t wait for the next one!

* I am not receiving anything for reviewing this, I’m just doing it BECAUSE IT’S AWESOME.
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Review: Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Title: Gone Girl
Author: Gillian Flynn
Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 978-0-307-58837-1
Published: Broadway Books (Random House), 2012
Purchase: Amazon, Barnes & Noble

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Main Characters: Amy, Nick

Synopsis: Nick and Amy appear to have the perfect marriage. They’ve got it all: looks, money, love. But one morning, Amy has disappeared, and all that is left are signs of a struggle. Was their marriage really as good as it looked? Is Amy dead or just missing? Is Nick the fragile, worried husband or is he… a killer?

Memorable Quotes:

  • They’re baffled by my singleness. A smart, pretty, nice girl like me, a girl with so many interests and enthusiasms, a cool job, a loving family … I know that they secretly think there’s something wrong with me, something hidden away that makes me unsatisfiable, unsatisfying. (Amy, p. 29)
  • I know I am going to be angry– that quick inhale, the lips going tight, the shoulders up, the I so don’t want to be mad but I’m going to be feeling. Do men not know that feeling? You don’t want to be mad, but you’re obligated to be, almost. (Amy, p.65)
  • I have never been a nag. I have always been rather proud of my un-nagginess. So it pisses me off, that Nick is forcing me to nag. I am willing to live with a certain amount of sloppiness, of laziness, of the lackadaisical life. I realize that I am more type-A than Nick, and I try to be careful not to inflict my neat-freaky, to-do-list nature on him. Nick is not the kind of guy who is going to think to vacuum or clean out the fridge. He truly doesn’t see that stuff. Fine. Really. But I do like a certain standard of living– I think it’s fair to say the garbage shouldn’t literally overflow, and the plates shouldn’t sit in the sink for a week with smears of bean burrito dried on them. That’s just being a good grown-up roommate. And Nick’s not doing anything anymore, so I have to nag, and it pisses me off. (Amy, p. 85)
  • My husband is the most loyal man on the planet until he’s not. I’ve seen his eyes literally turn a shade darker when he’s felt betrayed by a friend, even a dear longtime friend, and then the friend is never mentioned again. He looked at me then like I was an object to be jettisoned if necessary. It actually chilled me, that look. (Amy, p. 100)
  • Until Nick, I’d never really felt like a person, because I was always a product. Amazing Amy has to be brilliant, creative, kind, thoughtful, witty, and happy. We just want you to be happy. Rand and Marybeth said that all the time, but they never explained how. So many lessons and opportunities and advantages, and they never taught me how to be happy. I remember always being baffled by other children. I would be at a birthday party and watch the other kids giggling and making faces, and I would try to do that too, but I wouldn’t understand why. I would sit there with the tight elastic thread of the birthday hat parting the pudge of my underchin, with the grainy frosting of the cake bluing my teeth, and I would try to figure out why it was fun. (Amy, p. 224)
  • My body was a beautiful, perfect economy, every feature calibrated, everything in balance. I don’t miss it. I don’t miss men looking at me. It’s a relief to walk into a convenience store and walk right back out without some hangabout in sleeveless flannel leering as I leave, some muttered bit of misogyny slipping from him like a nacho-cheese burp. Now no one is rude to me, but no one is nice to me either. No one goes out of their way, not overly, not really, not the way they used to. (Amy, p. 250)

Review: My friend Caroline and I picked this up at the bookstore a couple weeks ago. I hate seeing a movie adaptation before reading the book; I’d rather have the book ruin the movie than the other way around. We were going to read it together and do our own personal sort of book club, but she works a lot more than I do and I simply couldn’t put this book down. Caroline, stop reading this right now and finish your book!

If you’re planning on seeing the movie and haven’t read the book yet, I’d advise you don’t read this review. Spoilers ahoy.

First and foremost, this book is a masterful piece of work. Amy is a masterful piece of work. Nick is a smarmy, spoiled baboon along for the ride.

Amy is… brilliant. She’s sharp, conniving, and knows what Nick is going to do before he even thinks about it. Amy does not like to be taken for a fool, and when she finds out that Nick is cheating on her with a ditzy twenty-three year old, she sets her sights on the ultimate revenge. She spends an entire year crafting this; every single spoken phrase, every single action is meticulously calculated. She doesn’t move unless she knows how it will be read once the plan is set in motion.What’s the plan? Why, to frame her husband for her murder, of course.

Like I said, Amy is meticulous. Her husband thinks she’s got an adorable affection for crime novels, but she’s really doing her research. She spends her evening writing a fake diary for the cops to find; she picks out real events from their shared history and twists them just slightly in her favor. She mentions real historic events that were happening at the time, things that would be sourced to ensure their plausibility. In the diary, she mentions feeling sick, describing textbook symptoms of antifreeze poisioning: yes, that’s right, she poisoned herself with antifreeze, then saved the vomit to later be wielded as evidence against her husband. She performed Google searches on his computer, things that would seem innocent until the police were looking for them: body float Mississippi river.

Somewhere along the way, Nick figures out what is going on. Of course he did– he’s a bumbling baboon, but he’s not a complete nitwit. All the proof that the cops are going on are things that were set up by Amy. Nick’s a deep sleeper? Perfect opportunity for Amy to plant his fingerprints all over the murder weapon. Nick’s cheating on Amy? Plant some underwear in his work office. Amy’s pregnant with a baby Nick didn’t want– wait, what?

I honestly think this is my favorite of Amy’s tricks. Her friend Noelle was pregnant with her fourth child. Amy invited Noelle over for lemonade and just happened to have drained the toilet– oh, it’s broken. When Noelle needed to pee, Amy later went and collected it, swapped it out at a doctor’s appointment, and voila– iron-clad laboratory proof that she, Amy, is in fact pregnant. What kind of monstrosity would kill his pregnant wife?! jeers the crowd. So cruel, so cruel. Because Nick did actually want a baby.

After hiring the best lawyer in the country, Nick finally learns how to act, and begins pleading with Amy via the national news. Come home, he says. I love you. He paints such a good picture of his adoration that even Amy begins to fall for it. He knew she would; that’s how well they know each other. Amy literally doesn’t believe she’s unlovable. She expects admiration, so when it’s granted, she believes it completely. Of course Nick loves her. Why wouldn’t he? Amy’s plans begin to change.

This is such a completely brilliant novel. Like I mentioned earlier, I legitimately did not want to put it down. I brought it to work with me and read over my sandwich at lunch. Amy’s plot is so precise, the lines so taught, that Nick never even had a chance. I read somewhere that we’ll never hear about the perfect crime, but this, my friends, is the perfect crime.

I chose the quotes above because they resonated with me the most. Amy and I have very little in common, but every good piece of writing has moments you can relate to. Especially that first quote; that’s me in a nutshell. To the outside world, I have plenty of redeemable qualities, and yet… single. So single. Anyway, for that second quote: I know what it’s like to be angry and then have it written off as “irrational.” I think every woman does, which is why the “do men not know that feeling?” was such a great piece of writing. The rest of the quotes are there not because they echo in familiarity against the inside of my skull, but because they’re some damn good quotes.

Check out the trailer for the upcoming movie here.

I’m having a hard time wrapping my head around this story as a movie, especially because 50% of Part I is a fabrication. The events are mostly true, sure, but all the feelings behind them are not. It’s easier to throw a plot twist like this at you in a book, I think. But it comes out next Friday and I will be there for sure, that you can count on!

Rating: ★★★★½

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Review: The Moon and More by Sarah Dessen

Title: The Moon and More
Author: Sarah Dessen
Genre: YA Fiction
ISBN: 0-67-078560-1
Published: 2013, Viking Juvenile

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Main Characters: Emaline, Theo, Benji, Luke

Synopsis: It’s the last summer before everything changes, and the change has already started. Emaline and her family run a realty business in Colby, renting out fantastic beach homes to rich families seeking the vacation of their dreams. Theo is among them, and from the moment they meet, everything changes. Emaline had been dating Luke since freshman year, but when he cheats on her, that relationship goes down the hole (surprise). Also, her birth-father rolls into town unexpectedly, toting along Emaline’s ten-year old half-brother, Benji. Emaline spends the summer with Theo and Benji, and along the way she realizes that only she has control over who she becomes, and that perhaps giving everything The Grandest Title Ever leaves no room for improvement.

Memorable Quotes:

  • “‘Yeah. Thanks. This lug nut’s being a bitch.’
    Of course it was a female. I sighed.”
  • “When you’ve never gotten love from someone, you don’t know what it might look like if it ever does appear. You look for it in everything: any bright light overhead could be a star.”
  • “Sometimes, when it came to events and people, it had to be okay to just be.”
  • “‘Life is long. Just because you don’t get your chance right when you want or expect it doesn’t mean it won’t come. Fate doesn’t punch a time clock or consult a schedule.'”
  • “She was dressing for the life she wanted, not the life she had.”

Review: Let me preface this by announcing that I am a huge Sarah Dessen fan. I have been, ever since I stumbled across This Lullaby at my local Borders’ outlet. Presumably, I always will be. I wish she could turn out a new book every week, that’s how much I long to desire them. However, I know that’s a sightly ridiculous goal, so… keep doing what you’re doing, Ms. Dessen. That being said, this novel certainly did not disappoint!

Even at the ripe old age of 24, it’s quite easy for me to relate to Dessen’s characters. She’s spoken of her love for the 16-18 age group before, and that she has no plans (as of yet, anyway) to move beyond it. She claims nostalgia. That’s fine with me, though, because she writes about the sort of loves and lessons that transcend age boundaries. She writes Strong Female Characters without having to drop them into such tropes as warranted by the TV/movie world, for example. (You can either be pretty and feminine, or ugly and an unfeeling warrior, etc.) Emaline works hard: she works full-time for her family’s business and somehow still managed to balance the studying required for an acceptance to Columbia University. She loves hard: she and Luke were together for more than three years before life just got in the way. She’s a feminist: she calls out Morris on his use of the word “bitch,” albeit subconsciously. (Thank you, Ms. Dessen, for that!) But Emaline is not afraid to cry, as evidenced when she disappoints her mother, or when her birth-father disappoints her. She feels lonely and not special, which are feelings everyone battles with, be they a teenage girl or not.

In a deviation from most of Ms. Dessen’s other books, this one does not end with the Girl Getting the Guy! Spoilers. Theo turns out not to be the one from her, and she goes off to East U free of romantic entanglements, ready to start again with someone new. This clearly doesn’t happen right off the bat, though, because at the end of the book we run into Emaline taking Benji to New York City for an art show. Not a boyfriend, but her half-brother. You go, Emaline.

If I had to give this book a big, capitalized Moral, it’d be You Don’t Need A Man to Be Happy. You might even be able to through an “especially” in there, in regards to her birth-father. Emaline learns that she had no obligation to be with Theo if he wasn’t making her happy, regardless of how many Best Dates Ever they had (or didn’t have). She also learns that sometimes parents really do know best, and that their love is truly unconditional: no matter how many times you disappoint them, they’ll forgive you and welcome you back with open arms. And that, even when you’re only two hours away, your mom still worries.

Rating: ★★★★★

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Review: Nobody’s Princess by Esther Friesner

Title: Nobody’s Princess
Author: Esther Friesner
Genre: YA Fiction
ISBN: 978-0-375-87528-1
Published: 2007, Random House

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Main Characters: Helen of Sparta, her family, and her friends Atalanta, Milo, and Eunike

Synopsis: Helen of Sparta, daughter of Zeus, is a young girl growing up in ancient Greece. She may not know exactly what she wants out of life, she knows what she doesn’t: she doesn’t want to marry a boy, she doesn’t want to learn needlepoint, and she definitely doesn’t want to just be pretty! Helen takes it upon herself to make her own dreams come true, such as learning to swordfight, and sets herself up to become Helen of Troy, one of the most famous women history will ever know.

Memorable Quotes:

  • “That would be so easy, wouldn’t it?” she said. “So easy to let someone else make your choices for you. That way, if you fail, it isn’t your fault.” She clasped my hands more tightly. “You deserve to live a better life than that.” (Queen Leda to Helen, p. 87)
  • “She said that until she met you, she thought she was the only woman alive who’d ever wanted something more than a husband, a family, and a hearth fire. Was she wrong?” (Milo to Helen, p. 256)

Review: Although I can definitely say this tale was intended for someone much younger than I, I must give credit where credit is due: this is a wonderful little novel. I’ve always gotten a kick out of historical fiction, and reading about a young girl’s struggle to make a mark on the world is something I think we can all identify with. We all grew up wanting to be the President, did we not? Helen sees the cookie-cutter mold laid out for her future and doesn’t want a piece of it. The characters are vibrant and well-fleshed out; you truly feel for Helen and her plights. Her friends are loyal and imaginative, though the prophesizing Eunike comes off as a mere plot device. In spite of that, however, there doesn’t seem to be much of a plot; it’s written more as a journal, detailing her day-to-day experiences and travels. There is a sequel, though, and if I can get my hands on it, I’ll definitely review it as well!

Rating: ★★★½

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Welcome!

Hi there!

I’ve decided that I read entirely too many books to not be able to share my opinions about them, so this will be my new project.

I’m going to review books of all different genres. There will be some series, some classics, some YA, some poetry… you’ll just have to stick around and see!

Please bear with me while I flesh out the site; I’ll be digging up books I’ve read in the past and will try to refresh my memory enough to write some decent reviews just to get up some content. Everything else will be live, as-read.

Thank you!

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